When:
April 6, 2017 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
2017-04-06T19:00:00-07:00
2017-04-06T21:00:00-07:00
Where:
Community Room, Helling Library, Nevada City
980 Helling Way
Nevada City, CA 95959
USA
Cost:
Free
Contact:

Salton Sea by Michael Lynes of Audubon California

Thursday, April 6, 2017 – 7:00 PM Community Room, Helling Library, Nevada City

Anyone who has been to the Salton Sea knows how incredible the birding is at this Important Bird Area. Audubon California is working with a broad coali on of state and federal regulators, water districts, farmers, conserva on and environ- mental jus ce organiza ons, and scien sts to nd solu ons to protect birds and people that live at and around the Salton Sea. The sea has been shrinking rapidly since 2003, when a water transfer agreement began to send por ons of Imperial Valley’s water to urban areas. As the sea con nues to shrink, it will expose up to 100 square miles of lakebed, resul ng in massive air pollu on in a region that already has some of the worst air pollu on and public health rates in the state. Mover, birds will lose tens of thousands of acres of shoreline and deep water habitat. This presenta on will provide background about the Salton Sea and how the current crisis developed and will discuss some of the solu on that Audubon is working on to address the problem.

Michael Lynes is the Director of Public Policy for Audubon California and is one of the leads for Audubon’s work at the Salton Sea. Prior to joining Audubon Cali- fornia in 2014, Mike was the Conserva on Director and then Execu ve Director of the Golden Gate Audubon Society in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he focused on regional planning and improving condi ons for Bay Area birds. Before then, Mike worked as an a orney represen ng nonpro t groups in environmen- tal protec on lawsuits. Mike started his career as a biologist with the Point Reyes Bird Observatory (now Point Blue Conserva on Science), where he focused on birds in riparian, wetland, and oak woodland habitats. Mike lives in Davis, Cali- fornia with his wife and two sons, who are currently more interested in catching Pokemon than watching birds.